Being a concert promoter is a major responsibility since you're working for a musical (or perhaps speaking) artist to take care of practically everything. It's not far removed from being a movie producer who has to deal with everything from financing on up to being on the set during production.

For a three to five-month concert planning timeline, you'll take care of the things the artist has no time to do. These aspects are some of the most taxing aspects to living on the road. Nevertheless, with your outlining and know-how, you'll make this period of time more enjoyable for everyone.

An artist going on tour for a lengthy amount of time is already a stress on the body and mind. You'll have to manage the most banal touring aspects no one wants to think about while planning on through to the day of the concert.

Once you get a tour plan outlined, the artist you work with will consider you a true confidante in taking care of the most pressing details.

Getting Started on a Road Tour

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All experts in the concert promotion business agree you need to start at least five months in advance during the booking process. When you're playing cities you're not familiar with, you'll want to do some routing as a preliminary step. Using Google Maps is a perfect way to plan out the itinerary to picture how you'll arrive at each venue.

In the beginning phase, though, you'll want to focus on due diligence to prove ethical responsibility. This comes through core funding and establishing a checking account in your company's name. It's essential to not mix up your private account with your company account to avoid any potential accusations of concert fraud.

Also hire a lawyer to deal with any legal issues. They'll help you through your agreements with venues. It's a complex procedure when you have to worry about multiple people getting paid and when it occurs. Legal guidance on offer sheets quickly helps with payment issues and other complicated deals.

Travel Arrangements

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At the five-month mark, it's time for you to contact the venues, deal with the contracts, and check for hotel estimates. If you're on a budget, maybe the artist or band you're working for could sleep on their tour bus. However, this usually isn't practical, and most artists want private rooms with some form of minor luxuries.

Dealing with visas and flight estimates for international travel can become a hassle, though having the five-month buffer gives you time to work out complications.

Insurance and Marketing

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At around the three-month mark, it's time to look into liability insurance to protect yourself against lawsuits. No matter if the concerts are held indoors or outdoors, anyone could get injured from equipment or something natural.

Once done, it's time to think about what kind of marketing you'll want to do. With social media, consider using Instagram to give a more visual essence of the artist's upcoming tour. Posting recurring Instagram pics on Twitter is easy to give notice of the approaching itinerary.

Social media is also a good place to promote ticket sales through a direct link to the ticket provider.

Producing Merchandise

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About a month before you go on the road, creating merchandise can bring a grassroots approach to getting word out. T-shirts are an affordable and effective merchandising effort, as is selling a CD of the artist's previous recordings.

Two to four weeks before the tour, create some tour books as well that provide compelling information about the artist not found anywhere else. By promoting this on the artist's website, it can generate buzz and more sales of the tour books later in the venue lobby.

The Day of the Concert

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As the concert promoter, you're responsible for the standard soundcheck the day of the concert. To create more buzz, don't hesitate to let fans inside early during the soundcheck to generate last-second ticket sales.

On a financial level, make sure you have petty cash available to cover unexpected expenses so you're not left in a quandary at the last second.

At this point, you'll have mastered the most stressful elements to concert promoting. Now you can reap the benefits afterward while enjoying the concert behind the scenes.

Don't forget to visit MyMusicTaste to bring your favorite artist to you!